Chiyo-ni (1703 – 1775


Chiyo-ni writings were influenced by Matsuo Basho. “One with nature” is Chiyo-ni style and she was immersed with it.

 

ah butterfly–


what are you dreaming


working your wings?

 

a single spider’s thread

 

ties the duckweed

 

to the shore

 

hands drop

 

all things on the ground – the clear water

 

on the road

 

today’s rain


the seed for clear water

 

when dropped


it is only water–rouge flower dew

 

Courtesy of Patricia Donegan and Simply Haiku

Advertisements

Song for the Ohlone


by Martha Robrahn

 

We have walked these hills and valleys long before your time
When the waters ran clear, the forests stood tall
The earth gave us all we could ever need
And we lived our lives in dignity

 

When the padres came into our land
We met them with a smile
We shared what we had
And we learned what we could
They came to save us we were told
Our sacred ways were not the way
To save our souls

 

In this land of the brave and the home of the free
Tell me what freedom means for me
My land is gone, my people scattered
And no one seems to think it matters
That the sacred ways we lived our lives
Are now only told through the white man’s eyes

 

We built the missions, worked the land
Toiled for days on end
When we tried to return to the life that we loved
They beat us and chained us
We did not understand
They said we no longer belonged to the land

 

In this land of the brave and the home of the free
Tell me what freedom means for me
My land is gone, my people scattered
And no one seems to think it matters
That the sacred ways we lived our lives
Are now only told through the white man’s eyes

 

And if crumbling mission records do not clearly show
Our births and deaths from then ’til now
Then the government says we cannot be
What we’ve been, who we are, the Ohlone

 

Our habitat destroyed, our numbers thinned,
It doesn’t take too much to see
If we were four legged or winged or finned
You would call us an endangered species

 

Courtesy of Indians.org

 

The Muwekma Ohlone Tribe of the San Francisco Bar Area includes the counties of San Francisco, San Mateo, Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara, and most of parts of Napa, Santa Cruz, Solano, and San Joaquin.

May Haiku


A long list

 

of side effects . . .

 

winter rain

 

Plona Oblak

 

autumn martyr in the first draft

 

Cherie Hunter Day

 

gravesite

 

of Adam Smith

 

free of charge

 

Patricia McKernon Runkle

 

Courtesy of the Modern Haiku Association

Haiku of Kyoshi Takahama


willingly bitten

by an autumn mosquito

of Yakumo’s old house

 

the lighthouse is low,

prominent is the sound of

the foghorn.

 

a morning glory

reflected,

a tropical fish submerging

 

pathetic!

on the wayside,

a tomb of ’awa’ pilgrim

 

the spring

of the country where

sparrows also fear no people

 

under the moon,

walking in a disguising costume

as a certain person.

 

Kyoshi Takahama 高浜 虚子 1874 to 1959 was a haiku poet during the Showa period. Masaoka Shiki, his mentor, gave Kyoshi his pen name. He studied Edo period Japanese literature and worked for a literary magazine called Nihonjin. Kyoshi was known to experiment with irregular numbers of syllables. In 1898 he managed the haiku magazine called Hototogisu which Shiki previously managed.

Practice Forgiveness


Your journey upon the Red Road will be filled with acts requiring forgiveness – forgiveness of others and yourself. Mindfully practice this incredible act of kindness act of humanity and the Red Road will be an easy path to follow. Also, absolution breeds the same in others. Be quick to forgive and others will grant you the same kindness.

Indians love their friends and kindred, and treat them with kindness.

— Cornplanter

Seneca, 1736 — 1836

The 19TH HIA Haiku Contest


nothing to cling to . . .

 

paper flowers blooming

 

in a glass of water

Jin Wada, Akita City

 

memories of water toy

 

made of celluloid and tinplate

 

floating up

Toshiko Wada,Suginami Ward

 

cicada shell—

 

the departed soldier’s

 

Sunday best

Satoru Koshikawa,Isumi County

 

Shiki’s memorial day—

 

hating English

 

loving baseball

Kyôko Shimizu,Nagoya City

 

dimmed by mist—

 

the waterfall hasn’t shown

 

its full height yet

Junko Sakai,Suginami Ward

 

how thin and clear

 

over the Himalayas . . .

 

winter moon

Kazuhiro Kitazawa,Shibuya Ward

 

Sponsored by Haiku International Association

Supported by Nihon Keizai Shimbun and The Japan Times

My Heart Soars


The beauty of the trees,

the softness of the air,

the fragrance of the grass

speaks to me.

 

The summit of the mountains,

The thunder of the sky,

the rhythm of the sea,

speaks to me.

 

The faintness of the stars,

the freshness of the morning,

the dewdrop of the flower,

speaks to me.

 

The strength of the fire,

the taste of salmon,

the trail of the sun,

and the life that never goes away,

they speak to me.

 

And my heart soars.

 

Chief Dan George

 

Dan George (1899 to 1981) was the chief of the Tsliel-Waututh Nation, a Coast Salish band in North Vancouver, British Columbia. His birth name is Geswanouth Slahoot. He was an actor, poet, and author. Some of Mr. George’s published books are “My Heart Soars,” “My Spirit Soars,” and “You call Me Chief: Impressions of the Life of Chief Dan George.” He acted in the films: Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) and Little Big Man (1970).